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I think this is one of the places where you could actually argue that music theory is just theory, because you can decide how you choose to analyze it, and there's no way to prove that either method is better. You could look at, "Which chord is the root of the chord progression in this music," but then you might find a song like Viva La Vida, where ...


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How is it possible to say about a track that is has been written in C Dorian or in D Phrygian You are the judge! If after hearing it you feel that C is the home note, then for you it is in C Dorian. If you feel that D is the home note, then for you it is in D Phrygian. You feel it, you don't calculate it. Saying that something is "written in" a ...


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A piece in Dorian will emphasize the sixth and seventh notes of the scale, because these are what distinguish it from other modes. A piece in Phrygian will emphasize the second note of the scale, because that is what distinguishes it from other modes. In general, a mode has a characteristic sound, which is determined by a set of intervals that differentiate ...


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I've never encountered something like this, and my guess is that this is untenable for at least two reasons: Since the major scale is a conjunct subset of the circle of fifths (C major is F–C–G–D–A–E–B rearranged), this allows the clean "add one accidental for the next mode" that we see (since adding an accidental is equivalent to moving around ...


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great discussion! Each key signature contains 7 notes, A-G, and therefore 7 modes; we can start on any one of the 7 notes within a key signature. Therefore, each of those 7 modes should use that key signature, otherwise we're teaching and/or encouraging a huge misconception and factual inaccuracy around key. F lydian is part of the exact same key signature ...


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I guess this would be a necropost since it's been inactive for a year & almost 4 y/o, but I stumbled across this while looking for mode mnemonics (ironically) & felt like leaving a response here. From your question to me you're asking "How do I find the root of Dorian in [X] Key/Scale" as opposed to trying to remember the order of modes. ...


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However, if the assumption above is correct, the octavi toni would end up in Ionian mode. As you've probably deduced, the assumption is incorrect. In fact, this question is based on a couple of incorrect assumptions. The first is the identity of the first mode, which is Dorian, not Ionian. Ionian didn't even exist when the modes were initially numbered ...


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