New answers tagged

3

Is there an application of [Modes of Limited Transposition in Microtonality] to produce anything meaningful musically? The TL;DR answer is (or, seems to be) no, at least not explicitly. However... Messaien's Modes of Limited Transposition are a special case of Transpositional Symmetry, a concept from Musical Set Theory, which refers to any set of pitches ...


0

You're overthinking it. What composer would care what something like that looks like? Concentrate on using your ears. The sound of the mode comes from the intended tonic by the composer. If I take C Ionian (Major) and emphasize the second degree (D) in a melody, then I'm playing Dorian. If I emphasize E, I'm playing Phygian and so on through the seven ...


3

A mnemnonic for which mode turns into which is numbering them 1-7 but starting from Aeolian rather than Ionian. Every mode reversed is the mode which brings the sum of the two up to 8. So Aeolian (1) is Mixolydian (7) reversed, Locrian (2) is Lydian (6), Ionian (3) is Phrygian (5), Dorian (4) is Dorian (4). As this numbering makes A the first and G the last,...


3

The notes are in the same order as a C major scale, it's just that the start point is different. The root note, or home, if you prefer, in C major (Ionian mode) is C. All the other notes bear some sort of relationship to that C, in particular, rather than any other note. (Although every note has some relationship with every other). And one main difference ...


3

What makes the modes differ is not the order of notes, but the tonal center. It is a note that feels like home, that resolves the tensions. In C ionian it is C, while in A aeolian it is A. In fact you can often take a melody, and depending on what chords you play along, it will feel like belonging to a different mode. Besides the tonal center in order to ...


1

Medieval modes were developed as a means of categorizing chant melodies. Generally speaking, chant melodies would have an often-repeated pitch around which the chant orbited (the tenor or reciting tone), an ending pitch (the final), and an overall range of roughly an octave. So the modes were defined in those terms. As the tonal system emerged from the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included