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1

Both are correct but need to be put into some kind of musical context for these statements to have meaning. He argues that if you want to play a C Dorian for example, all you need to do is start from C and just change the starting point of your scale to start with D instead and that makes it a Dorian. Another way to state that is: the second mode of the ...


2

There are two distinct ways to look at modes, as far as the notes are concerned. Your guitarist has slightly mixed them! There's also the confusing nomeclature - C Dorian is not the same as the Dorian of C. Trying to simplify things, let's first take the seven modes of a parent key of C. C Ionian D Dorian E Phrygian F Lydian G Mixolydian A Aeolian B ...


1

Some Eastern scales (by no means all of them - you can paint a horse to look like a cow, but not to look like a pigeon) can be approximated by scales formed from the 12 notes in an octave of Western music. The resemblance is about as accurate as Peter Sellers' 'Goodness Gracious Me' is an accurate depiction of a high-class Indian doctor. You can tell what ...


0

The early music of the Christian church has been strongly influenced by the modes of the Greek but also by the Byzantinian, mozzarabic and oriental music. The 2 modes: Ionian and Aeolian (major and minor scale) have been developed from those modes. The aeolian mode had to be adapted to what we call harmonic and melodic minor. Why these 2 modes are the ...


3

It's a statistical coincidence. In cultures with twelve or fewer pitches per octave, there are only so many modes or maqamat or scales or ragas or pitch class sets or whatever. In this case, the maqamat and the European medieval modes are both old enough, and roughly contemporaneous (7th or 8th century), to make it historically dubious that an instance of ...


1

Harmonic and melodic are only used (and useful) for minor scales, with the only exception being the harmonic major scale where the sixth scale degree is lowered. Note that the harmonic major scale given in your question is wrong, it should be (ref): C-D-E-F-G-Ab-B Other scales that use the harmonic or melodic modifier as shown in the examples in your ...


1

I haven't read Persichetti’s book so I maybe don't understand the context of your questions well enough to give you a satisfying answer. That said, I have studied 20C music at length and frequently use all sorts of synthetic scales in my own compositions, so hopefully something I say will be useful. Terminology might differ by region, but I think in ...


0

Caution: Heretic answer. Today's music "theory" is not a scientific theory. It is a large and complicated set of definitions and conventions that doesn't provide a toolkit for understanding how music works. Harmonies are just not built form semitones, but from ratios. All music builds on only two scales: The overtone scale (O-scale) and its inverse, the ...


0

When already Plato (360 b.C) was discussing in his Republic about the Dorian and Phrygian modes we can conclude that the Greek and the Roman and also the monks in the Christian church have handed down their Psalms with the name of the modes: It was sufficient to say in G or D or E, as these tones were already known as roots of modes. The Greeks modes had ...


1

I disagree with others on here that say you shouldn't worry about modes. Modes are extremely important and you'd be really limiting yourself musically if you don't understand them. They're all over the place in various songs and they're very distinct. But you're thinking about this in a wrong way. It's not about the notes. It's about the intervals and how ...


0

Modes are simply different ways to construct scales; instead of making alterations to key signatures with which you're already familiar, changes that make no rhyme or reason other than, "You do it this way to get this sound," you're taking key signatures you already know (because they're the key signatures for all 15 major scales) and applying them to ...


0

Confusion concerning the modes mostly comes from ignoring the root note. The root note is the note which creates a feeling of being at home, fully released tension, etc. and it is the most important thing in music. Instead of looking at the modes as "starting" from different notes of the major scale, I suggest to look at the different modes using the same ...


4

Is it the case that any set of tones can be used as scale? Yes, in theory. Literally any set of notes can be a scale. Sky is the limit. Why some scales used more frequently than others? Is it just a cultural thing or the are some (semi-) objective rules why some notes can be used as scale and other not? Yes. Both. It is certainly a cultural/historical ...


4

I would add to Tim's answer the following to address your comment on it being cultural. Any string of intervals might work but typically notes repeat after an octave and most cultures (but NOT ALL) tend to keep the scale structure within the octave. There are some very noteworthy exceptions. For example a scale (or melodic pattern) commonly used in ...


7

As you say, a scale is purely a set of notes in ascending/descending order. Any set of notes. Every note in semitones (chromatic scale). Notes in specific spacing (major, minor scale). Notes a tone apart (whole tone scale). The list goes on - and on. I doubt if you could come up with a set of notes that hasn't been used as a 'scale' already, but it's an ...


0

For some reason, many guitar teachers use modes as a short-hand for playing the same scale in different positions rather than because the student is really ready to understand modal theory. If this is what you've encountered, then just concentrate on learning the patterns of the major & minor scales across the fretboard. If/when you are actually ...


1

Modes are more useful for harmonic purposes than they are for melodic purposes. Lets imagine you're playing a II-V-I chord progression in C Major (Ionian). Your chords are going to be Dm-G-C. If you play the same progression in D Dorian (same notes), you're going to be playing Em-Am-Dm. This will still have the same general cadence, but will have a very ...


0

It is like you say! Don‘t worry about modes. They are very rarely in usual Popmusic, in Jazz they may be more often used but you can handle the modes like I do in Baroque music: When I play music e.g. by Fisher or Bach in a Dorian or Phrygian mode I don’t mind the mode at all. It is possible to read them by adding (imaging) another flat or sharp that it ...


9

For example in the background there is playing C major chord and I am playing melody on my guitar. One phrase starts from C note, 3 seconds later, another phrase I play starts from F note. Does it really mean that each phrase is based on different mode? No. Modes are not a classification system for melody snippets based on starting or ending notes. ...


13

Try this - play D E F G A and back again. Then play a C major chord (CEG). Does the chord sound like it would fit under the tune? Possibly not. But you've used 5 of the 7 notes that constitute the C major key! What you heard first was a snippet of tune that probably came from D Dorian - a mode from the parent key C. But it sounded minor, and C is major! It ...


10

No, merely starting a phrase on a different note doesn't put you into a different mode. Consistently ENDING phrases on a different note or chord might though! You're in D Dorian rather than C Ionian (equivalent to C major) when D becomes established as the home note. Here's an example.


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