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However, I was wondering how this extends for other modes, and if there is indeed a widely accepted convention for this? There is, and it's merely an extension of lead sheet analysis which is the basis of the NNS anyway. Mixo triads are: 1 2m 3d 4 5m 6m b7 So if this were Roman numeral analysis the verse D-C-G-D becomes I-bVII-IV-I or 1-b7-4-1 for NNS. The ...


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Major & minor pentatonic are widely accepted, but the other "modes" listed in Dom's answer only share the root of the modes on which they are built, but are missing the color tones that characterize that particular mode. D Dorian pentatonic D, E, G, A, C 1, 2, 4, 5, b7 (ex. b3 & 6) E Phrygian pentatonic - E, G, A, C, D 1, b3, 4, b6, b7 (...


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The Answer; or, TL;DR The Whole-Tone Scale is the structural glue that holds together the Simpsons's Theme. The Main Theme is fundamentally in Major, but avoids scale degree 4 in favor of #4, which serves as a chromatic lower neighbor to 5 and lends cohesiveness to the whole-tone glue. A true Lydian piece would avoid 5-1 relationships, which detract from ...


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If someone tried to describe this song to me by saying it's "modal", I would think of something completely different. It's bluegrass, with bluesy bends in the melody. I'd guess that even the most pathologically classically oriented music theorists must have encountered the term "blues" by now. Some anonymous Internet writers have written ...


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It's basically blues. Major key music inflected with blue notes. The rhythm accompaniment patterns are what make it specifically bluegrass. Most of the time the harmony - heard most clearly by following the bass - is one chord B major. But while the bass spends most of the time thumping along with roots and fifths of a B major chord it will do a little ...


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This tune is 100% modal, and it uses a single scale from beginning to end. Now, please note that "modal" doesn't mean "using one of the seven major scale modes". "Modal" describes any music which is built around a scale -- any scale -- rather than on the combination of chords and melody. For example, Indian classical music is ...


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The two key notes you've picked up on - M3/m3 and M7/m7 - are the hub of the blues scale notes - along with P5/d5, also featured. Strangely, in a major key (this song is in B major - one chord, all through!) although the 3rd, 5th and 7th notes all fit perfectly well, by playing or singing them a semitone lower works too. In a sort of 'sweet and sour' way, as ...


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Keywords here are blues scale, and even more importantly blue notes. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_note Blue notes appear in various styles, particularly often in blues, but also in jazz, rock and others. Various musicians, using various instruments play them differently, e.g. by playing note in between two pitches, sliding between them, playing ...


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Modes are defined by two things: (1) the home note, i.e. the tonic, and (2) the relative harmony around the tonic. A backing track has much more power in setting the home note than any guitar solo. You can play the D Dorian scale all you like, but if the bass player keeps playing the C note, you lose the battle, the total mode (which is a feeling really) ...


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Any backing track will basically use chords/harmonies from a particuar key/mode In that track, one chord in particular will feel like 'home'. That will be the key chord - literally. Let's take C major as the Ionian - parent - key. A backing track that uses chords from that key will home in on C major. There will be no confusion as to where it belongs. You ...


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I'm in the process of writing a load of two part exercises in the various modes including Locrian. Part of my research has come up with "Dust to Dust" written by John Kirkpatrick in 1968. It's the best example of Locrian that I have come across so far. It's on YouTube - I also found that Rush (the intro) by YZZ ...


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