New answers tagged

0

This is quite common with Phrygian melodies, because the half step between the finalis and the note above means that it is impossible to harmonize a descending melodic cadence with a V-i progression without chromatic alteration of the melody, which of course robs the melody of its modal identity. The other three modes, by contrast, support the V-i or V-I ...


0

Some modal chants are treated by the Baroque composer like they were major or minor, so they become adapted or transformed to another gender of tonality (e.g. chorals by Bach). Edit: A phrygian melody might have the finalis on the note E but end on chord A. Why is this? As you may know there are authentic and plagal modes: Plagal modes have the same root ...


0

Chants were not composed with chordal accompaniment in mind. Any such accompaniment doesn't fit too well. At best, one can try to fit chords using good voice leading practices. The modes used in chant classification are melodically derived so most modern jazz-and-pop-oriented techniques (harmonic) are not that useful. Of course, the performance of chant ...


2

Is A Dorian a G major scale No. Both have the same key signature of one sharp. But they have different tonics. The tonic is the "home" tone of the mode/key. If you just noodle around either of the two, they might seem interchangeable. If you play with some harmonic sensibility, you will hear the seemingly exact same tones between the two scales don't ...


2

The scale of the A Dorian mode contains all the same notes as the G major scale, and the set of notes can be found by starting on the second note of the G major scale. But that fact doesn't tell you anything about what A Dorian sounds like. The A Dorian modal feeling has almost nothing in common with G major. A Dorian is a minor mode, G major is not. A ...


1

A-dorian is the Re-Re ladder of the related G-Ionian mode (G-Ionian => "G-major") As D-dorian is the Re-ladder (related to C-Ionian: C=Do, D=Re and Re is the root tone) A-Dorian is the Re-ladder in G from A-A (Do=G, Ti=F#). So this means A is the root tone of A- "minor" ladder (scale) with an augmented sixth. The melody begins with A and the finalis will be ...


0

"Is A Dorian a G major scale?" Structurally, yes. It has the same notes in it as G major. Musically, it has its own identity. The tonic (if we can use terms from functional harmony when takling about modal music) is A. The G note is a minor 7th. "I’m not a theory guy at all just looking for some help" Help in doing what?


3

You may be aware of the interval formula for building the major scale, (w - w - h) - w - (w - w - h) where w = whole step and h = half step. There are 8 notes, one repeated, and 7 intervals or spaces between notes. I put parenthesis around a common, and repeated, pattern called a tetrachord. Dorian is built in the following manner, (w - h - w) - w - (w ...


1

Strictly speaking, A Dorian is not a G major scale. It's not a major scale, and it's not G based. True, it uses each and every note found in the G major scale, so we call G major its parent scale/key. But it's actually a minor scale, having its third note (C) a m3 from the root, which is note A. Dorian is the second mode of major scales, and uses exactly ...


2

A Dorian is one of the 7 scale modes built from the G major scale. It starts and ends on an A so it has all the same notes in it as a G scale. Playing a G scale starting on a B, C, D, etc. will give you 7 different modes (scales) all built from the same 7 notes and each one is unique. It's best not to think of it as a G scale because it has a different tonal ...


3

A song can be all and everything. Major and minor are just 2 special cases of modes. The key defines which of the 12 tones is the root tone and from there we can derive the mode and tonality gender of a song.


2

...music can be either from the major scale or natural minor scale... Whatever you read is mixing up key signature with key and scales. The statement is sort of a quick and dirty way to describe the basis of keys and harmony, but it can easily lead to misunderstandings, especially with minor key and chromatic harmony. The best thing to do is stop ...


7

There is a lot of question wrapped into one here. The key signature is indicated at the beginning of a piece on the sheet music. For example a song written in they key of C will have no accidentals, one written in A will have (F#, C#, G#) all indicated at the beginning. This does not mean that the song must stay in that key throughout. It is very ...


4

Key and scale are two different concepts, and physically, two different things. I understand that beginners (especially!) get confused. A piece in key C uses mainly the notes from the scale of C, and in early stages, the two could easily be one! However - the vast majority of pieces have a 'home' point, where they feel at rest. Regard it as often the start ...


3

From what I read, the key of a song or piece of music can be either from the major scale or natural minor scale. People are often taught something like that, but as you have noticed, it is not always true. 'Keys' are one way of describing the tonality of a piece of music. As you say, the key system does assume that a piece of music will be based around ...


1

Try to think of a key centre as a foundation for which to build complexity upon. If most of the notes are within a particular key (diatonic) then the music is usually considered to be in that key. From that foundation one can, by raising or lowering specific notes, move to other modes or the relative minor of the determined key. It's important to consider ...


0

Strictly speaking no, the scale and the key are two different things. E.g. if a song bases on an F-dorian scale, and its tonal center is F, then the key is F-minor. However, I don't believe it's incorrect to say "a song is in F-dorian", when you want to emphasize what scale is used, and it implies the key is F-minor.


0

Group together mode and key as types of tonalities. Treat scale as tonleiter the German word for scale meaning tone ladder, all the tone of the tonality going up or down in step-wise order. Mode can also have the meaning of the various rotations of a scale: ex. the seventh mode of the melodic minor scale is the altered scale. Don't confuse mere scales ...


3

I'd honestly say it's a bit of hokum. "Prime scale" is not a standard theoretical term (to my knowledge), and the various associations of "prime" in theory don't really accord with anything this author is talking about. But the real problem comes in the claim quoted in the question: Remarkably enough, out of all possible scales there are only five ...


3

There is a section of that page called "what is this site for?" http://www.tonalcentre.org/index.html#what%20is%20site%20for ...My theoretical style is unconventional and some of the concepts I introduce are quite novel... I did quick searches at Google Books and Grove's Online and didn't find prime scale, just like you couldn't find it. I think this is ...


1

I had never heard the term "prime scales" before, but the article seems quite advanced. The author describes the 3 things he wants from a scale (melodic resource, harmonic resource and tonally effective) and then he goes on to explain what scales we can derive from those principles. That's more than what you usually get when authors describe modes. Quoting ...


8

There's a little ambiguity in what constitutes the "very first modes." There were ancient scale systems in many ancient cultures, which had structures we might call modes in India, China, etc. But I'm assuming the question is asking where the "Western music" modes come from. And the scale for them really comes from Ancient Greece. To expand a bit on ...


5

The modes of the middle age church are derived from the antic Greek modes and these are developed from tetrachords, and yes it is something with history ... Early Greek treatises describe three interrelated concepts that are related to the later, medieval idea of "mode": (1) scales (or "systems"), (2) tonos—pl. tonoi—(the more usual term used in medieval ...


0

In German we have the to names for scales called: absolut names: a,b,c and relative names: do,re,mi (movable do!) May be the introduction of "relative names" could be confusing as you understand something different under relative, for this I write it italic. *1) But this concept of movable do ("relative" -> that is referring to the root key!) is most ...


0

There are really only two ways to regard and understand modes. One is, as you prefer, to consider each mode as a separate entity, with its own set of notes and flavour, and learn each 'scale' for each mode, which is then movable (on guitar especially) to start on each of the 12 different roots. The other is to think about one particular major (in this ...


1

I'm a self-taught pianist, too. And I am using a book that is more than 100 years old, namely James Francis Cook's Mastering the Scales and Arpeggios. Thousands of students have used this book in order to prepare for the examinations through the decades. It also contains an ingenious method for developing the greatest possible velocity of playing scales by ...


Top 50 recent answers are included