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1

Here are the chord changes for the first half of the verse in "Once Upon a December": Bm F# B7 E Em Bm Em F# The song as a whole is in B minor, which is clear just in these chord changes. However, the presence of both major and minor chords can lead to some confusion. Here's what's happening: Bm: this is the i chord -- the "home base" ...


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There is really no way to know exactly what is happening without the melody. If there are accidentls in the melody then clearly there is a key change, even if momentarily. However it could also be an example of a cycle extension. This is very common and also happens the other way, i.e. major changing to minor. As an example the 3 chord is the V of the 6 ...


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Basically, whenever you encounter a non-diatonic chord, it's safe to assume that something happens with the harmonic feeling at least at that point. The same goes with non-diatonic notes in the melody, i.e. if there are accidentals, unless it's a very short embellishment. Here is a very basic example, where the non-diatonic D chord is used in a C major key ...


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I had a listen to Anastasia and it's very much in the minor. It starts in Bm then modulates up a semitone to Cm, and ends up in another shift to C#m. Adding accidentals within a key adds flavour and interest, but the song is still based in the minor. By the way, Bm is not D. They simply share the same key signature - two sharps.


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This is a little complex to answer, because "dominant" has been used to mean different things over time. In the (late) Middle Ages, "dominant" actually just meant "reciting tone," which would be a fifth above the final of authentic modes and a fourth above the final for plagal modes. The first appearance of "mediant" ...


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A couple of things you should be aware of, first the Fsus4 shouldn’t be labeled as major since Fsus4 has no 3rd. Also, major chords don’t need to be labeled as maj, C and G is all you need. I agree with Lawrence that this can’t be labeled as any key in particular, to me it mostly wanders around different tonalities every 2 bars, which is totally fine. My ...


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With the given material, we can be pretty sure that it clearly is in C, and most certainly in C major. The fact that it begins in C minor is not that indicative of the overall mode, and there's plenty of music that begins with a different mode. There are many clues for this assumption. It's in C because: it begins with a C chord; it returns in C within the ...


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As you say, there's no one key that contains all those chords. But there's a lot of keys that it definitely ISN'T in :-) There's some C major/C minor. Then some E♭ major (the relative major of C minor).


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The list of tones (F C G D etc.) listed there is not a cycle of fifths. As it says, it is the "order of tonal gravity", i.e. the list of all notes, from the most consonant (or rather: the one with the greatest "gravitational pull" toward the root of the scale, in this case F), to the most dissonant (or rather, with the weakest ...


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"Everything must be a mode of the major scale" is a very rigid and narrow model of harmony, and it doesn't work when exposed to actual music. Let's relax the concept of mode beyond "modes of the major scale", by making the following additional definitions. I'll call it Real Mode to distinguish it from the narrower idea that's better ...


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It does belong to a major mode. It's the Mixolydian mode. G Mixolydian contains all the G major notes with one exception - F♯ gets thrown out in favour of F♮. Clashing with the 'major feeling of the song'? What? There are millions of songs that are ostensibly in major keys, but possess minor chords! Maybe you have the impression that major songs only contain ...


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Reading between the lines, I suspect I come from a similar background to you -- jazz / rock / pop music probably played on guitar. I agree with pretty much everything you said. For the likes of us (if I haven't misidentified you!) I think what you say here is the key: So to learn the fingering of a mode, just learn the intervals, just like any other scale. ...


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