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In standard eighteenth-century voice-leading practice, inverted seventh chords must be complete. This changes in more modern practice, but when you're practicing voice leading in this specific style, keep those inverted seventh chords complete. As such, you're 100% correct. Since the inversion determines the bass note, that determines what three pitches need ...


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Why must V7 (inverted or not) be complete? As with all major and minor triads, the 5th is dispensable. 4-part doesn't have to mean 4 voices ALL the time. In real music we often drop into 3, 2 or even just 1 voice. The 3rd and 7th are quite sufficient to imply a dom7 harmony.


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'How did they know?' Maybe they didn't ! Notice a couple of things. The sequence moves in 4ths, which is a common enough way. Think ii-V-I, used a lot in jazz, but also in lots of other music. The ii sounds like it wants to go to V (1 4th up), which then wants to go to I (another 4th up). So the 4th bar (Fmaj7) would move naturally to B&flat(maj7), and ...


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You're looking at what is called a "lead sheet". The intention is to provide the melody and basic harmony (chords) of a song. The chords are derived from the originally published song, or, in some cases, the song was composed initially as simply a set of chords with a melody. For example, Miles Davis's "So What" and John Coltrane's "...


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Probably because the composer wrote that chord when the music was composed. He probably wanted that particular sound or feel related to the melody. So whoever published the sheet music has seen the original music and therefore seen what chords the composer wrote in relation to the melodic line. The colour of the melodic line is closely connected to the ...


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