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I disagree that Ab/C is a useful way to label the first chord, at least in the context of Laura Palmer's theme. It completely obscures the modal flavour of the composition. Someone above described it as being in either C Aeolian or C Phrygian - in my interpretation, it is unambiguously in C Aeolian. C - D - Eb - F - G - Ab - Bb There is in fact space for a ...


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An interviewer asked Domenic Miller if we should use barre (bar) chords. His answer helped to shape my thinking; play chords the easiest way. I apply the same principle to chord notation: whatever makes it easier to understand. The C13 is exactly what is played in the guitar chord box. I suspect that's why it's notated that way; to make it obvious to a ...


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I disagree with Dekkadeci answer's. Instead: BbM7/C would be a proper and more understable name. Or maybe F11/C, which will gracefully accept the following note E. Look at the two other chords they are: Bb/C and Gm7/C. That C13 candidate does not contain a single note from the C Major triad indeed: no C, no E no G in the chord. Only a lasting bass, that ...


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You're still holding the C root at the bottom, so calling it a C chord of some sort is justified. You eventually also hold E (not F), B flat, D, and A at the fermata signs, so calling it a C13 chord (which should contain C, E, B flat, and A at the very least) is also justified. The C13 chord symbol looks fine.


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The whole point of shell voicings is to provide some "flavour", often for the purpose of supporting a soloist (maybe yourself), rather than to completely define every single chord, or to tell the soloist what they should play. Similarly, the lead sheet may say "G13" but you might well choose to play a G7 - and leave a bit of space. So although the answers ...


2

In Levine's Piano Jazz book he gives an example of Bud Powell voicings (shells) where the minor seventh and half diminished are the same - a minor seventh over root, all other tones omitted... ...it isn't stated in the text around that figure, but I think the assumption is the flat fifth will be supplied in the right hand. ...what's the difference ...


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The P5 from the root of a major or minor chord can be omitted because that sound is already heard in a harmonic from the root note, albeit more quietly than if it was played as a saparate note. The diminished chord has 1, ♭3 and diminished 5. That dim.5 is not contained in the harmonics of ,well, either note from that chord. So leaving it out means ...


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Quite often the most important note of a "m7-5" chord is the "-5", and leaving that out spoils its harmonic effect more than leaving out some other note. If you have to leave something out, ditch the seventh or maybe even the third. This is one reason why it's better to look at "Bm7-5" as Dm6/B. In the contexts where it's commonly used, there are two ...


13

You cannot omit an altered fifth. In other words, you cannot omit the b5 from either a half-diminished chord or a diminished chord, or the #5 from an augmented chord. The omission of the 5th only works for unaltered fifths that are implied by the harmonic overtones of the root.


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Voicings are about spacing of the notes of a chord into different octaves and sometimes doubling some of them. Inversions are about what is the lowest note. This example on Wikipedia has several different voicings for a C major chord. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voicing_%28music%29#Vertical_placement If instead of C, say, E was the lowest note, then it ...


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An obvious solution is to merely shift the first bass note down an octave. But the V - I bass line is so strong, I don't really mind it being approached by such a large jump. Not sure you'd better try that one in an elementary harmony exam though :-)


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