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Two more: "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys, known for being a rather complex little number anyway, starts its choruses in G♭ major, then shifts up to A♭ major, then up to B♭ major. However, the final chorus starts in B♭ major, then starts descending back down to A♭, then G♭. "Layla" by Eric Clapton periodically switches from C♯ minor to D minor with no ...


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I can offer a few examples: "Belle" from the musical "Notre-Dame de Paris" does exactly what you asked about – periodically modulates down. Unusually, it happens in the middle of each verse, not between them. Probably it reflects some kind of break each character undergoes. The song also modulates up quite conventionally between verses. Queen's "The Show ...


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I think these would be called passing chords. The first verse is Am F F/E Am7 Cmaj7 Em, and it contains Am F C Em. So I think the main progression would be Am F C Em, and the first verse is just adding a little and varying the harmonic rhythm to create more movement (i.e. by adding F/E and Am7 between the F and C chords).


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Well, you get to look before you buy! Piano/Vocal/Guitar will be a 'song copy'. SATB and piano will be an arrangement for chorus. Neither will be a 'full score' of the original recording.


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